You Won’t Believe How These Elusive Criminals Escaped The Law

We all know that feeling of being let down when the bad guy gets away. These are 10 criminals who eluded justice.

You Won’t Believe How These Elusive Criminals Escaped The Law

Have you ever wanted to know what it would be like to break the law? There are a lot of things they don't tell us about in school. But in this case, we're talking about criminal masterminds who have found a way to escape justice. These fugitives aren't just ordinary criminals - they've committed crimes so horrific that their faces and names have been plastered on milk cartons and posters across the country. Here, is the story of these elusive criminals and how they escaped the law.

Introduction

The Irish Chamber of Shipping - an organisation representing the shipping industry - published an online book called The 100 Most Wanted Fugitives. The book features the highest profile criminals in the world who are still wanted by the police. It also contains the names of 90 new high profile fugitives. Here is the introduction to the book. Out of control crime The number of criminal arrests in Britain has halved in the last decade and this has led to high levels of crime in the UK. The World Justice Project, a global network of legal experts, conducted an investigation in 2011 which was later published in the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative. The researchers discovered that the arrest rates of top fraudsters have halved in the last 20 years.

The Fugitives

Frank Abagnale In the late 1960s, Frank Abagnale graduated from Carnegie Mellon University with a major in sociology and minored in psychology. He was making good money, but was unsatisfied with his career. "I wasn't sure what I wanted to do," Abagnale told author David Maister in My Life In Print. In 1967, Abagnale tried his hand at commercial piloting, but lost the job in the first year. Undeterred, he started studying mathematics at Harvard University. After that, he became a bookkeeper and audited his college classes. One day, while he was looking at the students' grades, he recognized the name of one of his high school classmates. Abagnale thought he recognized the man's last name on the paper, and thought he was onto something.

How They Escaped the Law

Timothy Morrow, known as “Breakout Tim” Authorities describe Morrow as “one of America's most wanted fugitives.” He escaped from custody in 2004 and was arrested in Georgia on July 21, 2007, and sentenced to 20 years in federal prison. However, he escaped from a minimum-security facility in Cumberland, MD, on February 10, 2007. The following day, he was caught with an assault rifle and tried for receiving stolen property, but his escape bid was still unsuccessful. At this point, he has a total of 20,000 hours in solitary confinement. In 2009, Morrow was again caught after a shooting and robbery of an Atlanta-area motel. A former lover, he and his accomplice Thomas Johnson were arrested in Atlanta and charged with multiple counts of murder, robbery, kidnapping, and other crimes.

Conclusion

Tried and convicted for the infamous McMartin Preschool child abuse case, Paul LeRoy's number finally came up. In September, 2001, he stood before Judge Lucy Koh and was sentenced to 30 years to life in prison. Not before, however, did Judge Koh upend justice for the children, and approve of all of the defense's recommended sentences as well as LeRoy's own. She allowed him to stay in the general prison population, after all he had already served 7 years of that original sentence. He was eventually found out after serving 13 years in prison, and the whereabouts of the legendary loon have been the subject of rampant speculation ever since.