Emergency Use Listing: WHO Seeks More Data from Sputnik V Makers

racuse is seeking more data from the makers of Sputnik V, a new vaccine that has been shown to have a mortality rate of zero percent in animal trials. This would be an incredible achievement for the WHO, but it's not

Emergency Use Listing: WHO Seeks More Data from Sputnik V Makers

The WHO has been in contact with the makers of Sputnik V and is seeking more data from them before they can grant an emergency use listing. Sputnik V is a new vaccine that has been shown to have a mortality rate of zero percent in animal trials. This would be an incredible achievement for the WHO, but it's not possible without the help of the drug's makers. In order for the drug to be added to the Emergency Use Listing, the WHO needs more data on how to administer it and how long its effects will last. The organization is currently collecting this data from various sources and will continue

WHO seeks more data from Sputnik V makers

The decision to make it an Emergency Use Listing has been controversial as it appears to contradict some existing policies that advise vaccine makers not to discuss research results that could end up leading to new vaccines being approved. READ MORE: Moscow Aims to Roll Out a Nationwide Sputnik V Vaccine by 2021 Sputnik, which is often likened to Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty in the West, says that the potential risks of using the vaccine are minimal. The views expressed in this article are solely those of the speaker and do not necessarily reflect the official position of Sputnik.

What is the Emergency Use Listing?

When it comes to the WHO's Emergency Use Listing (EUL), it is a list of drugs and vaccines that are safe and effective. The group decides which drugs are suitable for "assignment to a limited number of users, following consideration of potential emergencies," according to the WHO. The list was created after the SARS outbreak in 2003 and has been updated since. READ MORE: Russian Scientists Tout Success of the Anti-Cancer Drug Against H7N9 Influenza For the Sputnik V, the manufacturer has created a patient study involving 3,000 participants and collected data on its use. However, as with all medications, the WHO will also evaluate the drug's "potential effects and side effects" in a separate group of users. This is a basic requirement before the EUL is updated.

How does this affect people with the disease?

The WHO needs to have a better understanding of how the disease works before they can approve the drug for emergency use. There's no doubt that people with Ebola can be killed by this new drug, but if they're given the drug when the disease is mild and the only symptoms they have are a fever and vomiting, then it will work. There have been some cases of people not being able to receive the right treatment because they haven't got enough information. 'I Can't Believe My Son's Saved by a Russian Vaccine' https://t.co/Df6Y9p7NmM — RT (@RT_com) August 21, 2018 What does the actual efficacy rate of the drug look like? So far, they haven't actually been given the drug so no way of knowing if the drug is effective. The study was carried out on monkeys. The drug is still undergoing testing.

Conclusion

With all of this in mind, we can perhaps all agree that the decision to put a Soviet-era propaganda doll on the list of drugs that the WHO can deem necessary is a waste of WHO resources. The idea that this vaccine, which has not been proved safe and has a known mortality rate of zero percent, is a matter of "public health" is also odd. Many serious diseases, such as Ebola, that affect the population need help from the WHO and this does not warrant adding an experimental drug to their list. "> How does a doll from the Cold War era, which came out of the Soviet era, help the World Health Organization's "public health" efforts? When your "public health" is all about minimizing the spread of germs, it's a bit confusing. But as far as I can tell, they seem to have a point.